Communicators divided over anonymous comments

Do anonymous intranet comments help or hinder internal dialogue? A recent poll says you aren’t sure.

Do anonymous intranet comments help or hinder internal dialogue? A recent poll says you aren’t sure

Ninety percent of communicators are not allowed to post anonymous comments on their intranets, even though one-third of them disagree with the policy, according to a recent poll of communicators.

The poll, conducted by Ragan Communications and PollStream, asked 1,007 communicators worldwide about both their personal feelings of anonymous intranet comments and their companies’ policies.

Thirty-two percent of communicators said anonymous comments on blogs and article should not be banned; 31 percent believe they should; 37 percent were undecided.

Meanwhile, 46 percent of communicator said their organizations do not allow anonymous commenting. Forty-one percent said their companies don’t permit commenting at all.

A mere 14 percent said their organizations allow anonymous comments.

The poll confronted a topic of increasing importance as more organizations adopt social media—or else adopt more social media—into their internal communications. Although communicators rarely decide whether or not to allow anonymous comments, they are the ones creating and overseeing intranet content.

Why companies allow anonymous comments

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