Infographic: How and why emails get misinterpreted

Sixty-four percent of people have sent or received an email that unintentionally caused anger or resentment. Can you relate?

Have you ever sent an email that someone misinterpreted?

Maybe a co-worker thought you sounded mean, or your boss thought you were too vague. An innocent message can spark all kinds of trouble.

An infogaphic from CPP and Sendmail investigates how and why people misinterpret emails. And they do—64 percent have sent or received an email that unintentionally caused anger or resentment.

Some of that anger comes from email pet peeves. For example:

  • Fifty-one percent of email senders are peeved when recipients don’t reply.
  • Thirteen percent of email senders are irritated by slow responses.
  • Twelve percent of email recipients are annoyed by long emails.

Also consider your recipient’s age when you send emails. Millennials, for instance:

  • Are more annoyed by bad grammar than other age groups.
  • Value fast replies more than other age groups.
  • Are less likely than 30-to-44 year olds to get angry over an email.

Look at the full graphic for tips on how to make sure no one misinterprets your next email:

(View a larger image.)

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